Edmund Basham

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A Little About Me

I’m a professional Ecologist from Cambridge, England, dedicating my life to exploring and researching the processes and scientific mechanisms underlying the world we live in. Since 2016 I have been living in Florida, completing my PhD research at the University of Florida, with related projects and publications that you can learn more about below.

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My PhD Exit Seminar

After 5 years of work, check out the various scales of time, space, and biodiversity that I looked at across my PhD

 

A feature in the Journal of Biogeography

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The folks at the Journal of Biogeography saw fit to feature my research where I talk about frogs in trees and what my future research might look like

 

A cool new article

An awesome new article by Joan Meiners looks at the various theories I have been exploring in Panama, with frogs moving up and down the trees between seasons

 

My Panama Research

Here, take a look at what I have been up to in Panama for the last few years.

 

My Research

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Vertical stratification of forest fauna

Since 2015 I have been climbing trees in tropical forests looking for amphibians. I have worked in Madagascar, Florida, Costa Rica, and Panama. Across all of these amazing locations I have seen similar patterns of how frogs can climb up and down in the trees, often in response to seasonal changes in climate.

I am always looking to go to new places to climb more trees. I want to keep gathering data on how amphibians live from the ground to the canopy, because its something we still know so little about.

The amazing yellow-bellied poison frog (Andinobates fulguritus)

Between 2017 and 2019 I have been climbing the same big trees in a forest in central Panama. Here, the tiny yellow-bellied poison frog uses the canopy of Espave trees during the wet season when it breeds and drops its tadpoles into bromeliads. They have unique patterns on their bellies, so when I keep coming back and catching them, I see that they nearly always stay on their same big tree, but go up and down over 30 meters between the wet and dry season. Amazing!

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Contact Me

Thanks for your interest in my research. Get in touch with any questions or comments regarding my work and publications. I’d love to hear from you.

1527 NW 8th Avenue, Gainesville, Florida

+1 352 2836848

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